Arms of Charles Marie Paul André d’Albert

Duke of Luynes, Chevreuse, and de Chaulnes, count of Montfort and Dunois, marquis of Dangeau, and lord of Maillé 1807-1839 (1783-1839)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV azure four chains conjoined in saltire argent (Alberti), II and III or a lion rampant gules, armed, langued, and crowned azure (Albert), overall in the fess point an escutcheon or a pale gules charged with three chevronels argent (Neuchâtel)

Arms of Louis Joseph Charles Amable d’Albert

Duke of Luynes, count of Montfort-l’Amaury and Dunois, marquis of Dangeau, baron of Bonnétable and lord of Langeais 1771-1807, duke of Cheveuse 1789-1807 (1748-1807)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV or a lion rampant gules, armed, langued, and crowned azure (Albert); II and III per quarterly i and iv azure three fleurs-de-lis or in the fess point a bendlet sinister couped all within a bordure gules (Bourbon-Soissons), ii and iii or a cross gules between sixteen alerions azure 4, 4, 4, and 4 (Montmorency-Luxembourg); overall in the fess point an escutcheon or a pale gules charged with three chevronels argent (Neuchâtel)

Arms of Charles Louis Auguste Fouquet

Count of Belle-Isle 1684-1738, marquis of Belle-Isle 1738-1748, duke of Belle-Isle 1742-1761 and duke of Gisors 1748-1761 (1684-1761)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV argent a squirrel* gules (Fouquet); II and III or three chevronels sable (Lévis)
*Squirrels are nearly always sejant. These do not seem to be, which may be an error in the depiction, or a position unique to the Fouquets.

None of the ordinaries have so uncertain an origin as the Chevron, which is so called from its expansion like the roof of a house, to which etymology Legh inclines when speaking of a person who bore three chevronels, ‘the ancestors of this coat hath built three great houses in one province.’

-From Inquiries into the Origin and Progress of the Science of Heraldry in England by James Dallaway, p457 (1793)