Arms of Dietmanns, Austria

Dietmanns
In use since at least 1965

Blazon: Gules four palets argent and a chief of the last chequy of the field, overall issuant from a mount in base a pine tree proper surmounted by a baton in bend sinister, interwoven with the palets or

The town has been in existence since 1496, with official incorporation coming in 1783. The region’s lush pine forests may be the source for the tree in the arms.

Advertisements

Arms of Ostrach, Germany

Ostrach
Granted 1978

Blazon: Per fess argent a spearhead bendwise, point in chief gules and sable a bend chequy argent and gules

The spearhead derives from the arms of a local nobleman, Schwendi von Ostrach; one seal of his arms dates to 1309. The bend chequy comes from the arms of the abbey of Salem, who owned the town from the 13th through 19th centuries. The bend has its ultimate origins in the arms of St. Bernard of Clairvaux, who founded the Cistercian order to which the abbey belongs.

Arms of the borough of Wandsworth

Wandsworth

London, England

Granted 1965

Blazon: Per pale indented argent and azure a fess chequy of the second and or, each of the last charged with a goutte of the second

Crest: On a wreath of the colors an ancient ship with a dragon’s head at the prow sable four oars in action and as many shields or on the bulwarks, flying a pennon gules and a sail of the arms

Supporters: On the dexter a dove wings elevated and addorsed azure and charged with four molets of five points or, in the beak a sprig of lavender proper; on the sinister a dragon sable wings elevated and addorsed argent and charged with four crosses couped gules

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: We Serve

The field of the arms is derived from the London borough of Battersea. The fess chequy is from the arms of William de Warren, first Earl of Surrey, and the gouttes represent the tears shed by the prosecuted French Huguenots, as many of them settled in Wandsworth when fleeing persecution in the seventeenth century.

Arms of Fuencaliente, Spain

Fuencaliente

Granted 1992

Blazon: Per fess I per pale argent a cross of Calatrava gules and chequy of fifteen or and azure, II argent three mounts in base vert, issuant therefrom a jet of steaming water of the field

The name of the town is derived from the Spanish for “hot springs” (“fuentes calientes”), which also refers to the medicinal springs in the area.

Arms of Argamasilla de Alba, Spain

Argamasilla de Alba

Granted 1974

Blazon: Per fess I per pale gules a Maltese cross argent and chequy of fifteen azure and the second, II of the third a sword in bend and a spear in bend sinister, points to the chief, surmounted by “Mambrino’s helmet,” all of the second.

This depiction is not particularly accurate; the original blazon specifies that the lower half of the shield should be azure, with argent charges. Inexplicably, the official site of the city uses a very similar depiction as that seen here.

The final charge is a reference to an incident in the Cervantes novel Don Quixote de la Mancha. The titular character sees a barber caught in the rain and wearing a basin as an impromptu hat, and declares this basin to be the fabled helmet of the legendary Moorish king Mambrino, which is supposed to make the wearer invulnerable. The novel also makes reference to the town, and a local legend holds (without much proof) that Cervantes was once imprisoned in a cave near the town.

Arms of Anchuras, Spain

Anchuras

Granted 1997

Blazon: Gules within a bordure chequy of the first a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and argent five gum rockrose flowers in saltire proper

These were formerly canting arms, as the town was previously known as “Anchuras de la Jara” (la Jara being a nearby region). The flowers depicted here are called “jaras” in Spanish.