Arms of Louis X of France

Louis X

In use 1314 – 1316

Blazon: Azure semé de lis or (France ancien) dimidiated with gules a chain in saltire, cross, and orle or, charged in the center with a pomme (Navarre)

I do want to briefly talk about some variations of the French national arms before we revisit the various regions and major cities. I wanted to touch on this particular coat not just because Louis X has a really excellent epithet (Louis the Stubborn!), but also because it’s a not-very-common example of dimidiation. Dimidiation is often used in the same circumstances as impalement or quartering – in this case, Louis inherited the kingdom of Navarre from his mother in 1305, and that of France from his father in 1314. The distinction there is that while both impalement and quartering keep both sets of original arms intact, dimidiation literally cuts them in half and reforms them into a single coat. Sometimes, like in this example, it works pretty well, and both arms are still easily identifiable. More often, though, dimidiation yields confusing or just plain weird results, so it’s understandable why it’s not used very often. (I’ve seen theories that badly planned dimidiation is where we get griffins, but they’re blatantly wrong; griffins predate heraldry by a good couple of millennia.)

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Arms of Donnersbachwald, Austria

Donnersbachwald

Granted 2002

Blazon: Argent on a pale vert between two flanks gules, the dexter charged with five trefoils in pale  and the sinister with a chain in pale, a triple mount in base and a stone hut of the field

Donnersbachwald technically no longer exists, as it was incorporated into the municipality of Irdning-Donnersbachtal in 2015. I’d assume that the mount refers to the local geography, which is extremely common for municipal arms. The vert and argent tinctures may be a reference to the Styrian arms, but that’s only speculation. Unfortunately, I’ve got nothing on the stone hut (or Kuppelbau, as the German blazon has it). My guess is that it’s a distinctive archeological construction in the region, which is also a pretty common motif for cities and towns, but I can’t find any mention of something like that. And if you’re wondering why I’ve called the charges on the sides “flanks,” see here. TL;DR it’s a charge specific to German heraldry, and they’re not the same things as flaunches.

Arms of Warwickshire County, England

Warwickshire

Granted 1931

Blazon: Gules a bear erect argent muzzled of the field collared and chained or supporting a staff raguly of the second, the chain reflexed over the back and encircling the staff; on a chief of the third three cross crosslets of the first; the shield ensigned with a mural crown or

Motto: Non sanz droict (Not without right)

The bear and staff have been used as symbols of the Earls of Warwick since at least 1268. One source gives their origin in medieval legend; the name of one Earl of Warwick, Arthgallus, was supposedly derived from “arthos,” or “bear”, and another was said to have used a broken tree branch to kill a giant. (There is no solid proof for either of these assertions.)

Arms of Concino Concini

Concinio Concini

(1569-1617)

Blazon: Party of six; I and VI azure three mounts in base or surmounted by as many feathers argent, II and IV or a double-headed eagle displayed sable, III and V argent a chain in saltire sable

Concini was awarded the additional quarters with the eagle in 1610 as part of his ascension to Marquis de l’Ancre, though I am not sure of its origin. It does not seem to be related to the German arms.

Arms of the House of Concini

Concini

In use since 1496?

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV azure three mounts in base or surmounted by as many feathers argent*, II and III argent a chain in saltire sable

*Intentionally unclear; some depictions have one feather on each mount, while others show the three feathers grouped on the central mount.

There is not much information available on the Concini family, but they seem to have been Tuscan in origin, possibly descended from the Counts of Catenaia.

Arms of Viveros, Spain

Viveros

Granted 1962

Blazon: Per fess or seven trees eradicated palewise in fess vert, the alternate three shorter and gules a sword fesswise point to the dexter argent hilted and pommeled or within an orle of chain of the second

These are most likely canting arms, as “vivero” is Spanish for “garden center” or “nursery”; hence the seven trees.