Arms of Villanueva de los Infantes, Spain

Villanueva de los Infantes

Granted 1421

Blazon: Argent a cross of Santiago gules between in bend two escutcheons or four palets of the second, and in bend sinister a lion rampant of the last and a castle triple-towered of the third windowed azure

There might be a better way to describe the positioning of the charges, but I’m not entirely sure what that would be. I’m hesitant to say they’re laid out in saltire, since most of them are different, and describing the individual position of each charge (eg. in dexter chief, in sinister chief, etc.) seems excessive. I ended up going with the bends because the charges seem to naturally fall into two groups – the lion and castle of Léon and Castile, and the shields of Aragon for Enrique and Alfonso, Infantes of Aragon.

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Arms of Villamanrique, Spain

Villamanrique

Granted ?

Blazon: Gules a cross of Santiago voided argent between two cauldrons chequy or and sable, each containing six serpents facing the exterior, in base a point dancetté vert, all within a bordure chequy of the first a castle triple-towered of the third windowed azure and of the second a lion rampant of the field crowned of the third

Whew, okay. Sadly, that blazon is probably going to be longer than anything I can write about it (if I cut out my frustration about the mystery of the snake cauldrons, which I will.) The city was actually named after a Manrique – specifically, Rodrigo Manrique, Grand Master of the Order of Santiago, which probably explains the cross of Santiago. He evidently split the town off from Torre de Juan Abad, and the citizens renamed it in gratitude.

Arms of Santa Cruz de Mudela, Spain

Santa Cruz de Mudela
In use since at least 2013

Blazon: Per fess gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and sable two bars argent and a pale counterchanged within a bordure gules charged with eight saltires couped or

According to legend, the town’s name comes from an incident in the early thirteenth century, where a man accused another of killing his father. When the former came to kill the latter, he saw a cross in the air above his head and dropped the sword.

Arms of Retuerta del Bullaque, Spain

Retuerta del Bullaque

Granted 1990

Blazon: Per fess argent a castle gules windowed or and of the last a bend wavy azure

The castle may be either a reference to or a representation of one of two local castles; the castle of Prim, a military residence that once hosted a meeting between Juan Prim y Prats and Pope Pius IX, or the castle Milagro (Castle of the Miracle) which was built by Rodrigo Jiménez de Rada during the Reconquista.

Arms of Herdwangen-Schönach, Germany

Herdwangen-Schoenach

Granted 1974?

Blazon: Argent on a mount vert a castle in ruin gules, in chief on a point dexter sable a bendlet and a molet of six points of the field and in sinister chief a like molet of the fourth

The municipal arms incorporate elements of each of the three former towns that form the present-day Herdwangen-Schönach. The castle is from Großschönach (where it was a depiction of Ramsberg Castle), the molets from Herdwangen, and the bendlet from Oberndorf.

Arms of Puebla del Príncipe, Spain

Puebla del Principe

Granted 1986

Blazon: Per pale vert a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and argent a cross of Santiago gules, pointé in base azure from a base proper a column argent

The Order of Santiago took possession of the region around the town in 1186, ultimately using it as a military basis during the Reconquista. They were formally granted ownership in 1243; this is likely the source of the cross of Santiago. I can only speculate that the column is a reference to the many local ruins from Roman times.