Arms of Anchuras, Spain

Anchuras

Granted 1997

Blazon: Gules within a bordure chequy of the first a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and argent five gum rockrose flowers in saltire proper

These were formerly canting arms, as the town was previously known as “Anchuras de la Jara” (la Jara being a nearby region). The flowers depicted here are called “jaras” in Spanish.

Advertisements

Arms of Almodóvar del Campo, Spain

Almodovar del Campo

In use since 1575?

Blazon: Per quarterly I azure a cross of Calatrava gules; II gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure; III argent issuant from a base a tree proper; IV on a mount in base charged with a lake, a tower, all proper

The name of the town is derived from the Arabic “al-mudawwar,” meaning “round water” or “round place,” probably a reference to the same lake that is depicted on the arms.

Arms of Almedina, Spain

Almedina

Granted 1993

Blazon: Or on a mount in base vert a castle triple-towered gules between two flags addorsed, the dexter of the second a crescent increscent argent and of the last a cross of Santiago of the third

The arms of Almedina are an excellent visual metaphor for the Reconquista: a castle between two opposing flags, bearing the symbols of the Almohad Caliphate and the Order of Santiago.

Arms of Almagro, Spain

Almagro

Granted 1991

Blazon: Argent a cross of Calatrava gules surmounted by a castle triple-towered or windowed azure; in base two shacklebolts pilewise transposed sable

Supposedly, Don Gonzalo Yáñez of the Order of Calatrava granted the town its original charter in 1213, and the Order maintained control of the area until it was incorporated into the crown’s lands in 1487.

Arms of Almadén, Spain

Almaden

Arms of Almadén, Spain

In use since at least 2007

Blazon: Per quarterly I gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure (Castile); II argent a lion rampant gules, armed, langued, and crowned or (Léon); III argent a cross of Calatrava gules; IV gules two hammers in saltire or; overall in an escutcheon azure three fleurs-de-lis or within a bordure gules(Anjou moderne)

The hammers are likely a reference to the importance of mining in the town’s history. Almadén was a major source of mercury and cinnabar since Roman times. Carlos III established an Academy of Mining in the region in 1777. The name of the town is derived from the Arabic “hisn al-ma’din”, or “fort of the mine.” The cross probably reflects Alfonso VII’s grant of the region to the Order of Calatrava in 1168.

Arms of Alhambra, Spain

Alhambra

Granted 1992

Blazon: Per pale argent on a mount in base gules a castle triple-towered or and of the first a cross of Santiago of the second; pointé vert a crescent pendent of the first

The castle on the mount is likely a reference to the nearby Castle of Alhambra, which was built on a nearby hill for defensive purposes. It dates back to around the 12th century, and was granted to the Order of Santiago in 1214. According to local legend, tunnels that connect the castle to the town.

These are fairly average arms – nice to see they’re not pulling the “mount proper” dodge, but the castle or on argent is on pretty thin ice – with pretty common charges for the area. The really old stories of secret tunnels are just a great bonus.

Arms of Alcubillas, Spain

Alcubillas

Granted 1967

Blazon: Per pale argent a cross of Santiago gules and of the last a castle triple-towered or, a crescent pendent of the first

Both the crescent and the cross of Santiago are likely due to the numerous times the town changed hands during the Reconquista. The first historical reference to the town, in 747, occurs on an Arabic map. Pope Lucius III subsequently granted the town to the Order of Santiago in 1181, but it was retaken by the Almohad Caliphate in 1191. It returned to the Order’s ownership in 1213. The castle may refer to a fortress that no longer exists.

There’s a part of me that really wants to read too much into the iconography of the castle being placed under the Islamic crescent rather than the Christian cross, and say that it’s a result of the town originally being under Islamic control, but a much larger part of me knows that’s probably bullshit. (But I want it to be true!)