Arms of Santa Cruz de Mudela, Spain

Santa Cruz de Mudela
In use since at least 2013

Blazon: Per fess gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and sable two bars argent and a pale counterchanged within a bordure gules charged with eight saltires couped or

According to legend, the town’s name comes from an incident in the early thirteenth century, where a man accused another of killing his father. When the former came to kill the latter, he saw a cross in the air above his head and dropped the sword.

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Arms of Santa Cruz de los Cáñamos, Spain

Santa Cruz de los Canamos
Granted 2006

Blazon: Vert a castle on a chief or a cross of Santiago gules between two hemp leaves of the field

The hemp leaves (cáñamos) are a canting reference to the town’s name, which it has borne since 1575.

Arms of Retuerta del Bullaque, Spain

Retuerta del Bullaque

Granted 1990

Blazon: Per fess argent a castle gules windowed or and of the last a bend wavy azure

The castle may be either a reference to or a representation of one of two local castles; the castle of Prim, a military residence that once hosted a meeting between Juan Prim y Prats and Pope Pius IX, or the castle Milagro (Castle of the Miracle) which was built by Rodrigo Jiménez de Rada during the Reconquista.

Arms of Herdwangen-Schönach, Germany

Herdwangen-Schoenach

Granted 1974?

Blazon: Argent on a mount vert a castle in ruin gules, in chief on a point dexter sable a bendlet and a molet of six points of the field and in sinister chief a like molet of the fourth

The municipal arms incorporate elements of each of the three former towns that form the present-day Herdwangen-Schönach. The castle is from Großschönach (where it was a depiction of Ramsberg Castle), the molets from Herdwangen, and the bendlet from Oberndorf.

Arms of Puebla del Príncipe, Spain

Puebla del Principe

Granted 1986

Blazon: Per pale vert a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and argent a cross of Santiago gules, pointé in base azure from a base proper a column argent

The Order of Santiago took possession of the region around the town in 1186, ultimately using it as a military basis during the Reconquista. They were formally granted ownership in 1243; this is likely the source of the cross of Santiago. I can only speculate that the column is a reference to the many local ruins from Roman times.