Former arms of Poltringen, Germany

Poltringen

Granted 1933 – 1971

Blazon: Argent a boar passant sable, armed of the field on a triple mount in base proper, in chief a cinquefoil gules

Both elements of the arms evidently derive from the Counts of Eberstein, an ancient regional family that died out in 1660. The cinquefoil was from their coat of arms (argent a cinquefoil gules seeded azure), and the boar (Eber) is a canting element on their name.

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Former arms of Entringen, Germany

Entringen

Granted 1929 – 1971

Blazon: Gules a duck naiant argent on water in base azure, on a chief or an antler in fess sable

It seems like the duck (Ente) was used as a canting symbol for the town long before the arms were formally granted; there are records of it dating back to the late seventeenth century, and it was used pretty consistently (albeit in different configurations) through the turn of the twentieth century. I’m assuming the antler is a reference to the arms of Württemberg, though I can’t find that explicitly stated anywhere.

Arms of Ammerbuch, Germany

Ammerbuch

Granted 1971

Blazon: Or a beech tree eradicated vert, overall a fess wavy in base azure

This is fairly typical imagery for municipal arms – local features with a touch of canting. The beech tree (buche) stands for the Schönbuch, a forest and nature park in the area, while the fess represents the Ammer river. While this particular municipality doesn’t use any symbols from the previous villages that were incorporated into its present form (which is common for modern German municipal arms), there’s still a nod to its origins; the beech tree is drawn with six roots and branches, each of which symbolizes a former town.

Arms of Donnerskirchen, Austria

Donnerskirchen

In use since at least 2006

Blazon: Azure on a mount in base proper a church argent roofed with an onion dome gules

Following the long tradition of municipal arms showing (relatively) well-known local buildings, the church depicted here is presumably the distinctive parish church of St. Martin’s, which was completed in 1680. These are also canting arms (“kirch” meaning “church”). I can’t find any record of these arms being used before 2006, but the town was incorporated in 1659, so I would assume they’re significantly older.

Former arms of the House of Scaligeri

Scaligeri

In use 1262?-1551?

Blazon: Gules a ladder in pale argent

These arms are a classic example of canting arms – “la scala” is “ladder” in Italian, which is almost identical to the family name of Scaligeri or della Scala. The first recorded della Scala was a clothes merchant named in an 1180 document. The Scaligeri later ruled Verona from 1262 through 1387, when they were ousted after a few decades of fratricide and tyranny. However, they made numerous unsuccessful attempts to recover the city, proving half the truth in their family motto, Nec descendere nec morari (neither descending nor stopping).

Arms of Torralba de Calatrava, Spain

Torralba de Calatrava

Granted 1975

Blazon: Per fess argent a cross of Calatrava gules and azure a tower of the first

Whatever kind of shade some ancient writers throw on canting arms, I love them. It’s like all the best parts of puns and linguistics put together! It’s especially satisfying when every element of the arms matches a component of the name in question. The “de Calatrava” clearly corresponds to the cross of Calatrava, from the military order that occupied much of the south of Spain during Reconquista. The first part of the name is covered in the base half of the arms – “torre alba” being a rather poetic way of saying “white tower” in Spanish. It’s possible the white tower in question is a direct reference to the town’s old fortress (which had a church built on it more than 500 years ago), but that’s pure speculation.