Arms of Centre-Val de Loire, France

Centre-Val de Loire

In use since at least 2005

Blazon: Azure three fleurs-de-lis or and a label of as many points argent within a bordure compony argent and gules

Weirdly, I can’t find much information on the origin of these arms, though I’ve found identical files going back to 2005. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if they’ve been in use for much, much longer, though. The arms themselves look like a composite of the arms of two former provinces: the three fleurs-de-lis and the label are the arms of both the House of Orléans and the former province of Orléanais. These are, of course, just the royal arms of France differenced, since the House of Orléans is a cadet branch of the Bourbons.The bordure compony seems to come from Touraine, though I don’t know how that originally got started.

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Arms of Villamanrique, Spain

Villamanrique

Granted ?

Blazon: Gules a cross of Santiago voided argent between two cauldrons chequy or and sable, each containing six serpents facing the exterior, in base a point dancetté vert, all within a bordure chequy of the first a castle triple-towered of the third windowed azure and of the second a lion rampant of the field crowned of the third

Whew, okay. Sadly, that blazon is probably going to be longer than anything I can write about it (if I cut out my frustration about the mystery of the snake cauldrons, which I will.) The city was actually named after a Manrique – specifically, Rodrigo Manrique, Grand Master of the Order of Santiago, which probably explains the cross of Santiago. He evidently split the town off from Torre de Juan Abad, and the citizens renamed it in gratitude.

Arms of Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, France

Bourgogne-Franche-Comte

Granted July 12th, 2017

Blazon: Per quarterly I azure semé de lis or a bordure gobony argent and gules, II and III azure biletté and a lion rampant crowned or, armed and langued gules, IV bendy of six or and azure a bordure gules

This is why I’m glad I’m revisiting these! As it turns out, there was an administrative reorganization of France in 2016 – and I did most of the regional French arms in 2014, so some of these arms are going to be brand new! (To me, at least.) Some regions did stay the same, but Bourgogne-Franche-Comté is only about three and a half years old. That being said, the design operates on pretty much the same principle as the name – the first and fourth quarters come from the former arms of Burgundy, and the second and third are the former arms of Franche-Comte.

The Burgundian quarters are, respectively, the arms of the county (later duchy) of Touraine and the House of Burgundy. The arms of Franche-Comté were allegedly adopted by Count Palatine Otto IV in 1280 when he switched his allegiance to France from the Holy Roman Empire. He previously bore gules, an eagle displayed argent, but opted for the azure and or to mimic the French arms.

Arms of Torre de Juan Abad, Spain

Torre de Juan Abad

Granted 1273

Blazon: Argent a tower and lion rampant gules, in chief a molet of five points azure, all within a bordure of the first charged with eight saltires couped or

Unfortunately, I have no idea who Juan Abad might have been, and it seems like nobody else does, either. It seems reasonable to speculate that the tower is a canting element (“torre,” or “tower” in Spanish). The lion is possibly taken from the arms of Alfonso X of Castile, who granted the town’s arms, but I don’t have anything on the saltires or the molet. One last fun fact – Francisco de Quevedo, a prominent satirical Baroque poet, ruled the town for a while after his mother purchased the title for him. While the town apparently didn’t take too kindly to him at the time (read: they sued him, and he won, but only after he died), they now host an “International Graphic Humor Center” in honor of his snarky legacy.

Arms of William de Bodham

de Bodham

Arms of Willem de Bodiham from the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Argent a bordure gules bezanté

The Bodham family appears to have been located in Norfolk since at least the early eleventh through the fourteenth centuries. Someone named Ralph held the manor of Bodham under Hugh de Montfort, thereby giving the family its name. There is another Bodham family, first recorded in 1550, but it is unclear whether they are related to the previous family. The newer line bears argent on a cross gules five molets or.

Arms of Felice Rospigliosi

Rospigliosi

(1639-1688)

Blazon: Per pale azure six molets of as many points in pile argent within a bordure indented throughout of the first and the second and per quarterly or and azure, four lozenges counterchanged

The arms on the dexter half of the shield are those of the Altieri family. This may be due to the fact that Felice Rospigliosi, the brother of Pope Clement IX, was elevated to cardinal by Pope Clement X (born Emilio Altieri) in 1673.

Arms of Santa Cruz de Mudela, Spain

Santa Cruz de Mudela
In use since at least 2013

Blazon: Per fess gules a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and sable two bars argent and a pale counterchanged within a bordure gules charged with eight saltires couped or

According to legend, the town’s name comes from an incident in the early thirteenth century, where a man accused another of killing his father. When the former came to kill the latter, he saw a cross in the air above his head and dropped the sword.