Arms of Veneto, Italy

Veneto

Arms of Veneto, Italy

Granted 1975

Blazon: Azure the sea proper in base surmounted by a rocky mountain also in base, thereon a winged lion passant and nimbed, the dexter forepaw resting on an open book all proper emblazoned with PAX TIBI MARCE EVANGELISTA MEUS sable

The Lion of St. Mark has been a symbol of Venice and the surrounding area going back to at least 1261, possibly earlier. The legend goes that St. Mark was shipwrecked in the Venetian lagoons when an angel in the form of a winged lion appeared and proclaimed “Pax tibi Marce, evangelista meus. Hic requiescet corpus tuum.” (Peace to you, Mark, my evangelist. Your body will rest here.) Later authorities claimed the lion was a symbol of majesty, the book stood for wisdom, and the halo for piety, but this sounds very much like the sort of post hoc rationalization that was common in later centuries.

Arms of Birmingham, England

Birmingham

Granted 1977

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV azure a bend of five lozenges conjoined or, II and III per pale indented or and gules, overall on a cross ermine a mitre proper

Crest: On a wreath or and azure issuant from a mural crown or charged with a Tudor rose a dexter arm embowed holding a hammer all proper

Supporters: On the dexter a figure representing Art proper vested argent wreathed with laurel vert tied by a riband gules, holding in the sinister hand resting on the shield a book bound of the last and in the dexter a palette with two brushes proper; on the sinister a figure representing Industry habited as a smith, holding in the dexter hand resting on the shield a cupel and in the sinister a hammer resting on an anvil all proper

Mantling: Azure lined or

Motto: Forward

Both coats quartered here were used by the de Bermingham family at various points in time. The family also quartered the coats, but in opposite quarters; the city changed the order for difference. The city was previously granted arms in 1889, which used a fess ermine instead of a cross, and a mural crown instead of a mitre. The supporters in the previous arms were also reversed, with Industry on the dexter and Art on the sinister.

Arms of Bad Sankt Leonhard im Lavanttal, Austria

Sankt Leonhard

In use since at least 1486, granted 1970

Blazon: Or the figure of St. Leonhard proper robed with a chain draped over his dexter arm sable, bearing in that hand a croizer argent and in his sinister hand a book azure, surmounted in base by an escutcheon of the field a lion rampant of the second, armed and langued gules, debruised by a bendlet of the third

Arms of Southend-on-Sea Borough Council, England

Southend on Sea

Granted 1915

Blazon: Azure on a pile argent between on the dexter an anchor on the sinister a grill and in base a trefoil slipped or a vase gules issuant therefrom a spray of lilies proper

Crest: Issuant from a mural crown gules the mast of a ship proper flying a flag argent a cross gules

Supporters: On the dexter a medieval fisherman holding in the exterior hand a net and on the sinister holding a book and a staff, all proper

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: Per mare per ecclesiam (Through the sea, through the Church)

Arms of South Cambridgeshire District Council, England

South Cambridgeshire

Granted 1978

Blazon: Gules on a saltire ermine between in chief a cornucopia or replenished proper, in fess two garbs and in base the sails of a windmill of the third, a closed book of the field clasped and garnished of the last

Crest: On a wreath argent and gules on a mount vert a great bustard close between the legs two quill pens in saltire all proper

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Niet zonder arbyt (Nothing without work)