Arms of Villamayor de Calatrava, Spain

Villamayor de Calatrava

Granted 1984; possibly in use since 1576

Blazon: Or a stone column* proper on a base vert, in chief a cross of Calatrava gules

Obviously, these are partly canting arms, but I’m more intrigued by the stone column. One of the sources I found implies that these arms are significantly older and, moreover, that there was actually a column in the town square in the 16th and 17th centuries. It seems the column was demolished sometime before 1639, but I have no idea why. It also seems that the original use of these arms dates back to around the same time, and putting a local landmark on municipal arms is an extremely common practice.

*I know, but I’m trying very hard to be mature about it, and the… distinctive shape seems to be unique to this particular depiction

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Arms of Solana del Pino, Spain

Solana del Pino
Granted 1985

Blazon: Or issuant from a base a stone pine tree proper between a stag and a mountain goat statant respectant sable, in chief a cross of Calatrava gules

The name and arms are a reference to the abundance of stone pines in the area, which is unusual for the climate.

Arms of Diersbach, Austria

Diersbach

Granted 1984

Blazon: Gules on a fess in chief wavy argent a sword in fess, point to the sinister proper, hilted of the field; on a mount in base rayonné or a serpent glissant reguardant sable crowned of the first

The fess wavy is a canting reference to the “Bach” part of the name (meaning river or stream), and the sword is the symbol of St. Martin, the village’s patron saint. The snake is a reference to a local legend of a treasure hidden in the nearby castle Waldeck and guarded by crowned serpents.

Arms of Puebla del Príncipe, Spain

Puebla del Principe

Granted 1986

Blazon: Per pale vert a castle triple-towered or windowed azure and argent a cross of Santiago gules, pointé in base azure from a base proper a column argent

The Order of Santiago took possession of the region around the town in 1186, ultimately using it as a military basis during the Reconquista. They were formally granted ownership in 1243; this is likely the source of the cross of Santiago. I can only speculate that the column is a reference to the many local ruins from Roman times.

Arms of the borough of Tower Hamlets, London, England

Tower Hamlets

Granted 1965

Blazon: Argent on a base wavy azure charged with two bars wavy of the field a lymphad sail furled sable pennon and flags flying gules, on a chief of the second between a pair of fire tongs and a weaver’s shuttle a pale of the first charged with a sprig of mulberry fructed proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors in front of a representation of the White Tower of the Tower of London proper two anchors in saltire or

Supporters: On the dexter side a sea-horse, on the sinister side a talbot, all proper

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: From great things to greater

Most of the elements in this achievement are drawn from the arms of the borough of Stepney, which was incorporated into Tower Hamlets in 1965. The fire tongs are the symbol of St. Dunstan, who held the Manor of Stepney when he was Bishop of London.

Arms of Cesare Borgia

Cesare Borgia

(1475-1507)

Blazon: Per quarterly I and IV or a bull passant gules on a base vert within a bordure of the field charged with eight flames of the last (Borgia), II and III per quarterly i and iv azure three fleurs-de-lis or, ii and iii gules (Albret)

Cesare’s arms show the Borgia’s family arms quartered with those of his wife, Charlotte d’Albret, sister of King John III of Navarre. They married in 1499, and she bore Cesare’s only legitimate child, Louise Borgia.

Arms of Castellar de Santiago, Spain

Castellar de Santiago

Granted 1990

Blazon: Per pale argent a cross of Santiago gules and azure on a base proper a castle triple-towered or, all within a bordure of the second charged with eight castles triple-towered of the fourth windowed of the third

The castle that appears in the arms and gives the town its name is at least 800 years old, probably older. The settlement that eventually became Castellar de Santiago may have begun in the fortress once it was no longer used for defensive purposes.