Arms of Villanueva de la Fuente, Spain

Villanueva de la Fuente

Granted 1985

Blazon: Per fess, I per pale argent a cross of Santiago gules and azure a croizer in bend surmounted by a mitre or, II of the last a walled town of the third, pointé in base of the first two bars wavy of the third

Unfortunately, I can’t find any information about these arms, but it’s pretty obvious to me that the base half is canting arms – the name translates to “new town on the river,” and bars wavy are a very traditional method of representing water or rivers. The Order of Santiago did control the town from around 1213 through 1243, which would explain the cross. I’m not entirely sure about the episcopal regalia; it does seem like a bishopric was established in the area under the Visigoths, but I’m not entirely certain about that.

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Arms of Ruidera, Spain

ALT
Granted 1998

Blazon: Per pale argent a pall gules and of the last, a Maltese cross of the first, pointé in base barry wavy of the first and azure

Although Ruidera fell into the territory of the Order of Santiago (per a 1237 treaty), it ultimately ended up as the property of the Order of St. John in 1783, which is probably the source for the Maltese cross. There are also many lagoons and wetlands in the area under national protection, which may be the source of the barry wavy point.

Arms of Bürg-Vöstenhof, Austria

Burg-Vostenhof

Granted 2002

Blazon: Argent on a mount vert a city wall with a gate tower or, masoned and windowed sable, in base water barry wavy of the field and azure

The mount refers to the name of the city (Berg meaning “mountain”). The wall and gate might be an allusion to the second half of the name; Vöstenhof is derived from “festen hof,” an archaic term for “manor house” or “castle.”

Arms of Agudo, Spain

Agudo

Granted 1984

Blazon: Per pale argent a cross of Calatrava gules and azure three oars palewise in fess, between six crescents fesswise in chief and in base argent; pointé in base vert a base barry wavy of four argent and azure

The crescents are likely a remainder of the area’s time under Arab rule; during the eleventh through thirteenth centuries, the area seems to have changed hands fairly frequently. The Order of Calatrava held the town from 1189 – 1195 and after 1269.

Arms of Newark Town Council, England

Newark

Granted 1561

Blazon: Barry wavy of six argent and azure on a chief gules a peacock in his pride proper between a fleur-de-lis on the dexter and a lion passant guardant on the sinister or

Crest: On a wreath argent and azure a morfex* argent beaked sable holding in its beak an eel proper

Supporters: On the dexter, an otter, on the sinister a beaver, all proper

Mantling: Gules lined argent

Motto: Deo fretus erumpe (Trust God and sally)

*The actual identity of this bird is unclear; this spelling does not reliably occur anywhere else. Possibilities include a moorhen, a martlet, a heron, a cormorant, or a grouse. (Campbell, Jillian, and Mike Cox. Secret Newark. Amberly Publishing Limited, 2015. Google Book Search. Web. 10 July 2016.)

Arms of Villatoya, Spain

Villatoya

Granted 1991

Blazon: Per fess argent two cauldrons or charged with three rows of triangles in gyronny gules, each containing four serpents 2 and 2 facing the exterior proper and argent a bridge gules over water in base barry wavy azure and the field

Snakes in highly decorated cauldrons are a popular motif in arms from Albacete. So far, I have been unable to determine the origin of this unusual charge.