Arms of Potenza, Italy

Potenza

In use since at least 2001; possibly since 1927

Blazon: Or a demi-eagle crowned proper issuant from three barrulets wavy in base azure

There is something absolutely hysterical about this eagle’s expression. It looks like it’s pointedly ignoring the fact that it either has no body or is stranded at sea. The one in this depiction is slightly more ruffled. We generally do not get this level of detail in heraldic charges, so this is delightful. Which is nice, because I couldn’t find much else about them. They do seem to be official arms, and that’s about it. I’d speculate they could have been granted in 1927, when Basilicata split into two provinces, instead of the one region it had always been; in 1948, when it was officially made an autonomous region; or possibly in 1970, which actually started implementing the 1948 law.

Arms of Basilicata, Italy

Basilicata

Granted 1973

Blazon: Argent four barrulets wavy azure

The barrulets are specifically intended to represent the four major rivers of the region – the Bradano, Basento, Agri, and Sinni. This was apparently one of three proposed coats of arms in the region. I can’t find any previous arms for the region; it looks like it took on the arms of whatever individual or organization was ruling the region at the time.

Arms of the borough of Hounslow, London, England

Hounslow

Granted 1964

Blazon: Per fess azure and gules on a fess wavy between two wings conjoined in base argent surmounted by a sword erect or, in base a lion rampant guardant per fess of the fourth and third, a barrulet wavy of the first

Crest: On a wreath of the colors upon ferns proper a tablot passant sable supporting over the shoulder a post horn or

Supporters: Two griffins or gorged with collars gemel wavy azure charged on the wings with as many seaxes

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: Juncti progrediamur (Let us go forward together)

The wings and sword represent London Airport and the aircraft industry. The lion is from the arms of Hounslow Priory. The fess and barrulet(s) are from the  Borough of Brentford and Chiswick, representing the rivers Brent and Thames

The blazon specifies one barrulet, but this depiction shows two. Either the number of the barrulets or the descriptor is off; it could be a barrulet gemel, which would be indicated by the collars on the supporters.

Arms of de Briquessart and le Goz

Briquessart and le Goz

Arms of Ranulf de Briquessart, Viscount of Bessin 1066? – c. 1089 (?-c. 1089) and Margaret le Goz

From p42 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first or three barrulets gules, the second azure a wolf’s head erased argent

The family tree lists Margaret’s husband, improbably, as John Bohun (the most well-known individual of that name was approximately 300 years younger than de Briquessart and bore a completely different coat of arms). However, the text makes
it clear that Ferne is referring to de Briquessart; he states that he was also called “Randulph” and misattributes their son’s appellation of “le Meschin” or “the younger” as the father’s surname.

It is unclear whether the wolf’s head was granted to Hugh d’Avranches or his father; Ferne’s family tree seems to indicate the latter, since Margaret would not have had any right to bear her brother’s arms, but the evidence for this is
sketchy.

Arms of ‘Randolph Fitzwright’ and ‘Maud de Gant’

Fitzwright Gant

From p30 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale, baron and femme; the first gules two bendlets engrailed vert, the second or three barrulets azure surmounted by a bend gules

Ferne presents the coat without any special commentary, besides noting that Gilbert de Gant had chosen to bestow the earldom on his daughter rather than on his son Walter – an unusual choice for the time, and evidently intended to make her more marriageable. Unfortunately, I cannot find any evidence that either of the individuals to whom these arms are attributed existed. It does not seem that, as Ferne asserts, Gilbert de Gant had a daughter named Maud, and even Ferne seems to gloss over the Fitzwright family; it takes less than a full sentence for the earldom of Kyme to pass through the Fitzwrights and to the Umfravilles, whose male line would eventually die out. It might be feasible that Ferne mixed up the names, and meant to write that Lucy, William de Gant’s sister, brought her titles into the Umfraville family; however, the text refers to Fitzwright and Robert Umfravill, Earl of Angus as distinct individuals.