Arms of Donnersbachwald, Austria

Donnersbachwald

Granted 2002

Blazon: Argent on a pale vert between two flanks gules, the dexter charged with five trefoils in pale  and the sinister with a chain in pale, a triple mount in base and a stone hut of the field

Donnersbachwald technically no longer exists, as it was incorporated into the municipality of Irdning-Donnersbachtal in 2015. I’d assume that the mount refers to the local geography, which is extremely common for municipal arms. The vert and argent tinctures may be a reference to the Styrian arms, but that’s only speculation. Unfortunately, I’ve got nothing on the stone hut (or Kuppelbau, as the German blazon has it). My guess is that it’s a distinctive archeological construction in the region, which is also a pretty common motif for cities and towns, but I can’t find any mention of something like that. And if you’re wondering why I’ve called the charges on the sides “flanks,” see here. TL;DR it’s a charge specific to German heraldry, and they’re not the same things as flaunches.

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Arms of Donnersbach, Austria

Donnersbach

Granted 1979

Blazon: Azure a chief gules, the partition line surmounted by five thunderbolts or

The arms are intended to be canting, with the azure field representing “bach,” or water, and the thunderbolts representing “donner,” or lightning. (While thunderbolts are usually drawn as zigzag lines terminating in arrowheads, they are also sometimes rendered as bundles of lightning, as here. I believe these are intended to be more similar to the linked depiction.)

Arms of Dietmanns, Austria

Dietmanns
In use since at least 1965

Blazon: Gules four palets argent and a chief of the last chequy of the field, overall issuant from a mount in base a pine tree proper surmounted by a baton in bend sinister, interwoven with the palets or

The town has been in existence since 1496, with official incorporation coming in 1783. The region’s lush pine forests may be the source for the tree in the arms.