Arms of Draßburg, Austria

Drassburg

Granted 1998

Blazon: Per fess azure a passion cross or upon a triple mount in base proper and per pale of the first a griffin counter-segreant crowned and bearing a scimitar in the left of the second and in the right three roses gules, slipped and leaved proper, and of the second between a stag’s attires a cross paté of the first.

I don’t have a direct source for the cross, but it seems like a pretty standard thing to put on your municipal arms if you are a small Christian community. However, I do have sources for the base half of the shield. The griffin – crown, scimitar, roses, and all – is taken from the Esterházy arms, which are fucking amazing. I will have to come back to those sometime in the future, because WOW. The Esterházys controlled roughly one-third of the area that currently forms Draßburg from sometime in the 1620s through 1848. Similarly, the other quarter of the shield is derived from the Zichy arms; they controlled the other two-thirds of the area from 1672 to 1715 and from 1795 to 1848. (The Zichys sold the area to the Mesko family in 1715, but after eighty years’ worth of legal proceedings, the Meskos were ordered to give it back.) If you’re wondering what happened in 1848, well… let’s just say the Austrian nobility went into a sharp decline right around then.

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Arms of Drasenhofen, Austria

Drasenhofen

Granted 2001?

Blazon: Per bend or azure an eagle displayed of the last and gules an eagle displayed and crowned argent

Unfortunately, there is not a lot of information out there about these arms. The most useful thing I can do is point to the Fünfkirchen family, who were prominent in the area for several centuries – at least from the mid-fifteenth century through the end of the Habsburg Monarchy in 1804. They bore per pale, per fess argent and azure, and or. This might be the source of the tinctures in the dexter half of the shield, but I have absolutely nothing to back that up.

Arms of Dornbirn, Austria

Dornbirn

Initially granted 1655; regranted 1902 and 1929

Blazon: Gules a fess argent, overall a pear tree issuant from a mount in base vert fructed or

Although the name “Dornbirn” doesn’t actually have anything to do with pears (Birnen), the arms are, nonetheless, canting. The municipality became part of the Habsburg possessions in 1380, which they apparently loved so much that when Archduke Ferdinand Charles sold the town to the lords of Ems in 1654, the inhabitants were furious. They refused to acknowledge the Ems as their sovereigns, and promptly raised 4000 guilders (around €47,000 or $52,000 USD) to buy themselves back. Impressed by their loyalty, the Archduke granted the arms above.

However, it might not have been loyalty so much as a deep enmity for Ems; apparently, the lords of that family were really into witch hunts and illegally confiscating property, even more so than most seventeenth-century nobility. After their debt overtook them in the mid-eighteenth century, the inhabitants of Dornbirn proceeded to buy up all of the Ems’ former holdings in the area.

Arms of Dorfstetten, Austria

Dorfstetten

Granted 1981?

Blazon: Paly of four azure, or, argent, and gules, a pine tree proper

There is really not a lot of information about this municipality online. The only reason I can guess at the date of the arms granting is due to someone’s photo of the ceremony. Unfortunately, I cannot make out the text on the grant; while official grants don’t usually have any kind of explanation for the arms, sometimes they do. Given that 80% of the area is wooded, that seems a likely source for the pine tree charge. I really don’t know about the paly of four, which is much more unusual. If I absolutely had to guess, it might have something to do with the fact that the municipal area includes four villages, but I have absolutely nothing to back that up. (And heck, maybe they just liked it.)

Arms of Dorfgastein, Austria

Dorfgastein

Granted 1952

Blazon: Gules pointé in base or, three roundels counterchanged

The partition of the field is from the arms of the Lords of Goldegg, who held (disputed) control over the valley from 1272 presumably through the house’s extinction in 1449. The roundels are derived from the arms of Nonnberg Abbey, which formerly held possession of the village of Unterberg, one of the six villages included in the municipality. (You can see the abbey’s arms on the dexter here, though the tinctures are hard to make out; the sinister arms are those of the Schneeweiß family.)

Arms of Dorfbeuern, Austria

Dorfbeuern

Granted 1965

Blazon: Per pale gules and azure two wings displayed argent, surmounted by three roundels in pile of the first, second, and third

The wings (and possibly also the division per pale) are derived from the arms of Michaelbeuren Abbey, though I’m not quite clear on whether those are the arms of the abbey itself, or the abbot Ulrich Hofbauer. (The positioning here suggests the abbey, though; I’d guess the sinister coat is the abbot’s personal arms. Traditionally, in ecclesiastical heraldry, the arms of one’s office take precedence over any personal arms.) The three roundels are a symbol of St. Nicholas, the town’s patron saint, albeit with a tincture swap; they are more usually depicted as bezants, the better to recall the story of the anonymous gift of three dowries.