Arms of Bürs, Austria

Burs

Granted 1931

Blazon: Per fess argent a cross paté sable fimbriated azure and gules three annulets of the first

The cross has been a symbol of the village since at least the 19th century. The annulets are drawn from the arms of the former Lords of Bürs.

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Arms of Brunnenthal, Austria

Brunnenthal

Granted 1983

Blazon: Argent a rose gules slipped and seeded or within an annulet of the last and a base with a Jochschnitt azure

The Jochschnitt (or “yoke cut”) is a charge used exclusively in Germanic heraldry that refers to a semi-circular incision towards the base of the shield. Charges may have multiple Jochschnitts. The base is intended to represent the local spa, which was already well-known in the 17th century. The rose is the symbol of St. Mary, patron saint of the town.

Arms of Eastwood Town Council, England

Eastwood Town Council

Granted 1951

Blazon: Lozengy argent and sable, on a chief or an annulet of the second between two torteaux

Crest: On a wreath or and gules in front of a wheel issuant therefrom a mount sable lozengy argent rising therefrom in its flames a phoenix proper

Mantling: Gules lined or

Motto: We seek the best

The annulet is derived from the Plumtree arms, and the torteaux from the Greys of Codnor. The black diamonds and the flames in the crest are intended to symbolize coal mining and the energy derived from it. The wheel is a reference to the town’s history with the Midland Counties Railway, which was initiated in Eastwood in 1832.