Arms of Lazio, Italy

Lazio

Granted 1984

Blazon: On an octagon vert charged with another argent, thereon another gules, a saltire party of five; in the center point per pale gules and azure an eagle displayed with wings inverted and crowned argent (Rome); in the dexter chief azure a lion rampant or holding a dagger azure, in chief two branches of oak and laurel ensigned by a circlet, in base two cornucopias conjoined in base, all proper (Frosinone); in the sinister chief, azure on a bend vert fimbriated or between in chief a tower on a mount in base proper and in base an anchor, three ears of wheat of the last (Latina); in the dexter base, gules between two bendlets or the letters SPQS, between each three annulets intertwined, all sable (Rieti); in the sinister base, per fess azure a lion passant guardant or on a base proper and gules a cross argent (Viterbo)

This is…. I don’t… okay. Okay, fine. I don’t have a good explanation for the octagon, or the arrangement of the arms in saltire, but okay. The eighties were a weird time, I guess. The thing is, the actual component coats are all pretty reasonable on their own, and it’s not uncommon for regional arms to incorporate the arms of their component cities/provinces/regions. (I plan on delving further into the individual provincial arms once we get to those provinces.) The arrangement here is just… something else. I can honestly say I’ve never seen anything like it before.

Arms of the borough of Tower Hamlets, London, England

Tower Hamlets

Granted 1965

Blazon: Argent on a base wavy azure charged with two bars wavy of the field a lymphad sail furled sable pennon and flags flying gules, on a chief of the second between a pair of fire tongs and a weaver’s shuttle a pale of the first charged with a sprig of mulberry fructed proper

Crest: On a wreath of the colors in front of a representation of the White Tower of the Tower of London proper two anchors in saltire or

Supporters: On the dexter side a sea-horse, on the sinister side a talbot, all proper

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: From great things to greater

Most of the elements in this achievement are drawn from the arms of the borough of Stepney, which was incorporated into Tower Hamlets in 1965. The fire tongs are the symbol of St. Dunstan, who held the Manor of Stepney when he was Bishop of London.

Arms of Almuradiel, Spain

Almuradiel

In use since at least 2008

Blazon: Per fess I per pale i argent a cross of Calatrava gules and ii or the Roman numeral III within a stylized letter C azure; II of the last an anchor of the first

The anchor may be a reference to travel via the river Despeñaperros. The second quarter may refer to Carlos III, who incorporated the settlement into the Spanish crown in 1780.

Arms of West Lindsey District Council, England

West Lindsey

Granted 1974

Blazon: Vert a fess ermine of five spots between in chief an eagle displayed, wings inverted perched on a thunderbolt fesswise between two garbs or and in base on water barry wavy argent and azure a Viking ship of third, sails of the fourth

Crest: On a wreath vert and argent on a mount an oak tree proper fructed or bound thereto by a chain proper two anchors in saltire of the third

Supporters: On the dexter a Lincolnshire Red Shorthorn Bull and on the sinister a Lincoln Longwool Ram both guardant proper, each supporting a croizer or

Mantling: Vert lined argent

Motto: Strive for the gain of all

Arms of Southend-on-Sea Borough Council, England

Southend on Sea

Granted 1915

Blazon: Azure on a pile argent between on the dexter an anchor on the sinister a grill and in base a trefoil slipped or a vase gules issuant therefrom a spray of lilies proper

Crest: Issuant from a mural crown gules the mast of a ship proper flying a flag argent a cross gules

Supporters: On the dexter a medieval fisherman holding in the exterior hand a net and on the sinister holding a book and a staff, all proper

Mantling: Azure lined argent

Motto: Per mare per ecclesiam (Through the sea, through the Church)