Arms of Bleiburg, Austria

Bleiburg

Granted 1650; in use since 1322

Blazon: Azure on a base proper a winged bull passant or

The winged bull is a common symbol of St. Luke the Evangelist, but the connection between the saint and the town is unclear. The base in the representation above is not consistently depicted, and some versions include a banner reading “St. Lucas” instead.

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Arms of Nicholas Malmains

Malmains

From the Dering Roll (c. 1270-1300)

Blazon: Gules three dexter hands erect in pale argent

This representation does not have the charges in the correct position; in order to be in pale, they should form a vertical line down the center of the shield, like the ordinary. Alternatively, the blazon may be incorrect; it may be attempting to describe the charges as “in pile.”

Arms of Lauterbach, Germany

Lauterbach

In use since 1746?

Blazon: Azure two war scythe blades palewise addorsed argent

The war scythe is a polearm that probably evolved from the more well-known agricultural tool. For somewhat obvious reasons, the war scythe was a popular weapon in many peasant uprisings. Its appearance in these arms, however, comes from the noble family of Bissingen-Nippenburg, who ruled the area around Schramberg since about 1648.

 

Arms of Tarazona de la Mancha, Spain

Tarazona

Granted 1987

Blazon: Vert a castle triple-towered or windowed gules between two lions rampant combatant of the second, langued of the third, in chief a double-headed eagle displayed and in base a lamb passant argent

The motifs of the castle and the lions are extremely popular in Spanish municipal arms as a reference to the twin kingdoms of Castile and Leon. Unfortunately, I cannot find any information on the potential origins of the eagle or the lamb.

Arms of le Meschin and ‘de Vere’

le Meschin and de Vere

Arms of Ranulf le Meschin, Earl of Chester 1120-1129 (1070-1129) and ‘Maud de Vere’

From p42 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first azure three garbs or, the second per quarterly or and gules, in the second quarter a rowel argent(?)

Ferne gives le Meschin credit for originating the azure-and-or arms of Chester (though I cannot verify the use of these arms before Hugh de Kevelioc ascended to the title in 1153). The garb, unsurprisingly, is said to represent “perfect
notes of aboundaunce” and “the fruite of that most happy mother peace.” (49) Ferne takes time to specifically commend the heraldic use of agricultural symbols: “[A]nye instrument appertaining to the tilling & earing of the earth, or
any fruit or seed proceeding and growing by the industry of man, maye bee borne in Armes, and it is good armory.” (51)

I cannot find any evidence that anyone named “Maud de Vere” existed. Historically, Ranulf le Meschin wed Lucy of Bolingbroke. (The previously-mentioned William de Roumare was her son from her second marriage to Roger Fitzgerold de Roumare.)

However, the information on Ferne’s family tree, as well as the coat of arms, seems to indicate some connection to the de Vere family which is not borne out by other available evidence. Ferne’s depiction of the arms has some clear
differences – the colors of the quarters are reversed, and the molet is pierced and in the wrong quarter.

Arms of Blaindorf, Austria

Blaindorf

Granted 1985

Blazon: Or a pale azure, issuant from the dexter side of the pale and the sinister side of the escutcheon two fleurs-de-lis, and another into the sinister side of the
ordinary, all in saltire and counterchanged

This was a tricky coat to blazon, and I’m still not sure that it’s either as clear or as accurate as it could be. The Dunningen post from last week notwithstanding, it’s not common to see charges issuing from partition lines, so there’s not really an accepted way to describe it. I think that’s a shame, since it’s very visually appealing, especially combined with counterchanging.

Arms of Socovos, Spain

Socovos

In use since at least 1991

Blazon: Per pale argent a cross of Santiago gules between two escallops in base proper and azure a castle triple-towered argent windowed sable

I’ve chosen to blazon the escallops as proper, because while proper charges can be placed upon any metal, tincture, or fur, argent-on-argent is definitely not allowable. The “proper” color of a scallop shell is very similar to argent, so while this configuration is acceptable under the rules of blazon, it is probably not the most effective design choice.