Arms of Huntingdon and de Blondeville

Huntingdon and de Blondeville

Arms of David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon 1214?-1219 (1144-1219) and Matilda de Blondeville (1171-1233)

From p43 of Lacies Nobilitie by Sir John Ferne (1586)

Blazon: Per pale baron and femme; the first argent an escutcheon within a tresseure fleury counter-fleury gules, the second azure three garbs or

As grandson of David I of Scotland and younger brother of William I of Scotland, David was entitled to bear the royal arms with a difference. Judging from Ferne’s depiction, he used two methods of differencing that are more typical of
Scottish heraldry than English: changing the tinctures and using a different charge. The tresseure and use of gules still clearly connects him to the royal family of Scotland. According to Ferne, the nontraditional differencing is due to
his royal blood, since “for the difference being little & in the feeld far off, not easely to be perceaved, should bring a confusion to the people, so that is should be difficult to them, to discerne which is their King.” (63)  He
attributes the specific choice of argent and an escutcheon to “the defense of verity, and sincere truth, signified by the cullor of white.” (65)

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